Album Review: Rob Zombie ‘The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser’

The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser

  1. The Last of the Demons Defeated
  2. Satanic Cyanide! The Killer Rocks On!
  3. The Life and Times of a Teenage Rock God
  4. Well, Everybody’s Fucking in a U.F.O.
  5. A Hearse That Overturns with the Coffin Bursting Open
  6. The Hideous Exhibitions of a Dedicated Gore Whore
  7. Medication for the Melancholy
  8. In the Age of the Consecrated Vampire We All Get High
  9. Super-Doom-Hex-Gloom Part One
  10. In the Bone Pile
  11. Get Your Boots On! That’s the End of Rock and Roll
  12. Wurdalak
rob-zombie-the-electric-warlock-acid-witch-satanic-orgy-celebration-dispenser

Rob Zombie’s new album, wonderfully titled The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser, was released on the 29th April, and has been described by the band themselves as the heaviest yet in their discography.

It’s a classic metal album, with an introduction to the style and inspirations behind it, a couple of breathers in the middle, and a definitive ending, and takes Rob Zombie right back to their industrial metal roots. But first of all, what’s an electric warlock? The album art suggests a psychedelic feeling, and the 60’s hippie connotations with paganism/witchcraft/similar religions and the discovery of new styles of rock seem to tie in with this name as an homage to the influences.

It might not be in the same style of music as Jimi Hendrix or Cream, but the artwork certainly runs in the same vein. This is nothing new for Rob Zombie. He has always used experimental/punk/rebellious influence in his words and art. So immediately, it’s clear that this is nothing outrageous or hugely different from predecessing albums. I’m just wondering if the title actually means anything at all. What’s Rob’s interpretation I wonder?

Now, for the music. Satanic Cyanide! The Killer Rocks On! Is the second track, and it’s a true rock belter. It’s about rocking on, and sticking two fingers up to anyone who tells you they don’t get it. A dedication to alternative scenes and cultures, Rob Zombie’s classic vocal samples and synth melodies are catchy and relevant, as ever.

Following straight on from this, curiously, is the track The Life and Times of a Teenage Rock God. I say curiously, because it follows on from a track describing how much fun it is to be in rock culture, so it’s almost like a biographical thing – Rob talking about his times as a teen. However, I’m not sure if the ‘Teenage’ part is referring to Rob being a god for teens, or the teens being the gods. Either way, it works. It could be humourous; poking fun at other ‘gods’ of alternative music these days, or he could be laughing at the fact he himself is of an older generation. So while the meaning is unclear, I’m sure younger people would agree with me in saying that the meaning doesn’t matter. Rob Zombie continues to be full of energy and fun, and any age can be a fan, if they like what the band is doing.

Some of the tracks have a real classic nineties metal sound – I can’t believe I’m calling it classic – and this is as refreshing as it is cliched. But I think that’s my personal taste. So much of metal is either too hairy, or too simple, and this sits nicely in the middle, bringing together samples and synths with heavy riffs and party anthem lyrics.

The Hideous Exhibitions of a Dedicated Gore Whore takes a groove metal route; with a rhythmic delivery of words, and a funky organ riff. It’s sexy, and pays homage to independent women. So I like to think. She doesn’t take any shit, and she’s crude. The groove continues during the middle of the album, and single In the Age of the Consecrated Vampire We All Get High is a full-frontal dance number. The guitars are heavy as hell, and the chanted “Get-get-get-get high!” is only going to stir hips. The penultimate track Get Your Boots On! That’s the End of Rock and Roll, continues the message of keeping the party going that started 60 years ago, and ignoring the fogies that try and tell us we’re living dangerously, but the album closes with what is probably the heaviest track on the whole record. Wurdalak is much darker in sound, with more goth metal elements than anything. Describing himself as Wurdalak (a Russian vampire), the slow-pace and length of the track is like nothing else on the album. It closes with a melancholy piano solo and sounds of a raging thunderstorm.

Maybe it’s the comedown from the massive party we’ve all just enjoyed. Maybe Wurdalak was the host all along, destined to suck our blood and turn us all into the undead. It’s certainly something Rob Zombie probably thinks about on a regular basis. Whatever the reasons, it’s a classic rock album closer; lengthy, stand-alone, moody and definite.

Electric Warlock Acid Witch is a Rob Zombie album through and through, with nothing dramatically different or outrageous as far as his particular style goes. However, it is fun as anything, and a real pleasure to listen through, with its complete structure satisfying rock fans of many genres.

About The Author

Late 20s, married, British, bisexual with a tonne of sass, and sure opinion.
If I’m not writing, I’m working with a blues/garage rock band that I manage, or I’m creating and editing content on YouTube.
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